Blender Art Nouveau Door

More of the door   #Blender

This entry is part 8 of 9 in the series Art-nouveau door

Hi folks, I was unable to do much door work this week until today. Mostly I worked on the door itself. This meant painting the actual door texture based loosely on the reference picture. So here is the reference picture: And here is the texture I painted in Photoshop: I tried to make it look “used” and also admit to tracing a little bit :) I then turned it into a

Completely reworking Textures and normal map on door  #Blender

This entry is part 7 of 9 in the series Art-nouveau door

NOTE: a bit of a technical one today. So now I had a proof of concept design and had commenced a bit of trial work on it. Thing is, I always believe in self-critique. I sat down and looked at what I had done so far and whether it was correct. I noticed a few things, listed in the diagram below: I also decided that I wanted the bottom of

Normal map now on brick wall

This entry is part 6 of 9 in the series Art-nouveau door

Hi all, Despite being tired, I came home and used Photoshop to make a normal map of the brick wall. This is just a filter in Photoshop that I applied to the skin I created earlier. Here is the normal map image: For those of you new to 3D modeling, this will give me some depth in my final image. I had intended to create a displacement map, but I need to

Baking my procedural texture    #Blender

This entry is part 5 of 9 in the series Art-nouveau door

In my previous post in this series, I had unwrapped each of my objects, ready to texture them. Then I had an epiphany: if procedural textures exist, then does a brick one exist? OK – I’ll put that into plain English for the non-modelers or new modelers braving this post. A procedural texture is basically an image that has been created by writing a computer program instead of drawing it

Progress on #Blender door as at 5 Nov 2017

This entry is part 4 of 9 in the series Art-nouveau door

Due to illness, I have not achieved as much as I had hoped. Also note, this post talks a bit about technical 3D modeling issues, but I have tried to make it accessible to my non-technical readers who may be interested in starting to model. The first thing that I have done is set the pivot point on each object within my model. This is not something that I have done

4. Rigging to open and close properly

This entry is part 9 of 9 in the series Art-nouveau door

I have now successfully rigged my door to open in the doorway. So another task complete. I found the following video very easy to understand in rigging my door: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r2mIOFDgdME&t=70s So another of this week’s tasks is now achieved. :) Greg 0

3. Basic shape in place

This entry is part 3 of 9 in the series Art-nouveau door

Hi all, This is where I am at so far. To achieve this I did the following: Created a block which I then made tall, broad and relatively thin. This would be the wall into which the door would be fitted. I used MS Word to create basic doorway and window shapes, converted these to 2D objects and basically cookie-cut the shape into the wall. The cookie-cutter shapes I then

2. Design for a 3D door model

This entry is part 1 of 9 in the series Art-nouveau door

Hi all, as per my weekly plan, here is a rough 2D design of the 3D art nouveau door that I intend to create in Blender. As per normal, my rough design has been completed in PowerPoint. The inspiration was taken from the following door (By Jopparn (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons): My vision is to create 4 elements in Blender: a wall with an appropriately

1. Initial thoughts on a 3D Art Nouveau setting to be made in Blender

This entry is part 2 of 2 in the series Digital set number one

Just a short post. I did my initial brain dump of design specifications in PowerPoint. These are fairly simple. Here is a link to a Google image search on Art Nouveau. What do you see? Curved lines and natural shapes. So I had a go at using PowerPoint to create some basic outlines of wall shapes. This said, they feel more Art Deco (i.e. more geometric that natural in form).