Review: "The Solar Sea" by David Lee Summers

Introduction Whales, solar sail driven space craft and mysterious particles located near Saturn. I really am not sure what the book’s blurb is promising me, but it certainly does not sound run of the mill. I have read four of David Lee Summers’ novels: two vampire stories, a horror tale set in an observatory and a steam punk western. All were entertaining and slightly unusual. David is not a conventional

Review: "Prism City: Gun for Hire & Heir to an Empire" by L K Weir

Introduction “Prism City: Gun for Hire & Heir to an Empire“ is the debut novel of L.K. Weir and was published earlier in 2020 by Prism City Press. I came about reading it when I saw the author describe her work as science fiction noir (or something similar). Back in my youth I was a fan of film noir and had even once made a four minute promotional film noir

Review: "The Astronomer's Crypt" by David Lee Summers

NOTE: David Lee Summers, author of this book, is a blogging and Facebook friend of mine. This said, the following review is an objective one, warts and all. David has, as always, packed an awful lot of ideas, information and tropes in his horror novel The Astronomer’s Crypt. Love it! The basic premise revolves around the trope of stolen Native American artifact with supernatural qualities and the havoc that ensues.

Review: The Sharpe series by Bernard Cornwell

You may recall that my last book review was of David Lee Summer’s second book in the Scarlet Order series.  I enjoyed it thoroughly and despite being a vampire tale it brought back memories of the historical novels that I used to enjoy. So I decided to look for a historical series that was new to me. Having been an incredible fan of authors such as  C. S. Forester, Alexander

Review: "Dragon's Fall Rise of the Scarlet Order" (Book 2 Scarlet Order) by David Lee Summers

Disclaimer: David Lee Summers is an online friend. This said, I have endeavoured to be completely objective in my review of this novel. Key take-aways It reads like a combined Mary Renault and (adult) Rosemary Sutcliffe novel crossed with Anne Rice novel It covers about 2000 years from Classical Greece to the Renaissance and so tends to jump centuries at a time I enjoyed reading it Overall This novel is

Review: "Vampires of the Scarlet Order" by David Lee Summers

Disclaimer: David (the author of the novel) and I interact in a friendly manner online. This said, my review is entirely objective. Key take-aways It reads like a Louis L’Amour novel crossed with Anne Rice novel (with some X-Files thrown in) Initially feels like a series of connected short stories but transforms into a fast-paced action story I enjoyed reading it Blurb on Amazon Vampires of the Scarlet Order is

Review: "Owl Dance" by David Lee Summers

Disclosure Before reviewing Owl Dance, I just wish to acknowledge that its author, David Lee Summers, is someone that I like and regularly interact with via social media. In no way does this fact impact the impartiality of my review. I also wish to state that I purchased the ebook myself and am therefore under no obligation towards the author. Initial Comments To be honest, Steampunk is not something that

The Astronomer's Crypt - trailer

David Lee Summers, whom I have mentioned before as a visitor to my humble blog, has just released this awesome book trailer. I just had to share. If you are into writing and science fiction/fantasy and aren’t following him already, then go and check him out. Greg I’m proud to announce the release of the book trailer for my novel The Astronomer’s Crypt. As you’ll see, we took a somewhat

Review: "My Name is Nobody" (1973)

I try to watch a film every day. This is to help stir my story-telling instincts as I work on the never-ending novel. I’ve falling into a patch of westerns. The latest was a 1973 film called “My Name is Nobody”. I chose this film for several reasons: I never realised that Henry Fonda and Terrence Hill had been in a film together and was curious Terence Hill westerns mostly

Review: "Sensei" by David Charney

A brief review. You will probably be astonished to read that one of my favourite novels is not science fiction or fantasy. It is a novel set in feudal Japan. “Sensei” by David Charney was a novel that I read as a young man (around 20 years old). I rarely say that any novel had a profound impact, but this one did. It made me look at myself. The story is

Review: "Pale Rider" by Alan Dean Foster

Alan Dean Foster is an author whose work I have read and owned since I was a teenager. In the mid-1970s I saved up and bought one of the books of the animated Star Trek series that Mr Foster had written. When I bought the book of Star Wars just after the film came out, ostensibly it was by George Lucas but it turns out that Mr Foster ghost wrote

Review: "Suicide Squad" (2016)

NOTE: I intend to avoid spoilers as best I can, but will talk in generalities that may (or may not) hint at things. So read on at your own peril. Truth be told, I found little entertainment in the first two films of the DC Extended Universe. I will probably get some hate for expressing that. Thing is, the original comics and the animated series and movies were just so

My growing appreciation of Roger Cross (@theRogerCross , #DarkMatter #Continuum)

OK – I know it’s probably daggy (is this word used outside of Australia) to tag the subject of my blog post in the heading so that it will appear on his Twitter feed, but what the heck. I am only just learning all this Twitter stuff (WordPress and Instagram are my normal scenes). Thing is, I am really starting to enjoy seeing Roger Cross in television series and I am happy

SyFy have released a great video about The Expanse television series #TheExpanse

The video’s description is “Adam Savage (of Mythbusters!) takes you behind the scenes of The Expanse and gives you a look into Season 2!” Well, Adam Savage is in it, but the video is so much more. OK, in some ways it is a 20 minute commercial for the series. By this I mean that it has sound bites from various actors, directors, scientists and fans. It also jumps quickly

Review: "The Abominable" by Dan Simmons

I first stumbled across Dan Simmons’ writing around 1990. The book was a science fiction delight called “Hyperion”. It was a science fiction epic, a Canterbury Tales for space and time travel. Since then I have frequently indulged myself in his novels. As an author he leans towards the fantastic, whether it be in science fiction or horror. And be warned, they are not light weight. “The Abominable” held certain expectations.

Review: "Downbelow Station" by C J Cherryh

During the visual convalescence I slowly read old paper-based novels. One of these was a re-read of an old favourite: “Downbelow Station” by C J Cherryh. First let me mention the version I own. It’s the 1986 Methuen edition and it has a great cover by artist Chris Moore. Mr Moore’s website can be found here. He is a great science fiction artist and well worth checking out. I also

Cinematography of spacecraft in "The Expanse"

If you haven’t seen it yet, “The Expanse” is a recent science fiction television series based on the series of book with the same name by James S A Corey (actually the alias for two authors working together). The first in the series is “Leviathan Wakes”. I really love this series of books and was lucky enough to stumble on them almost as soon as the first one was published. Anyway,

Review : "Sinister Intent" by Karen M Davis

I must admit that I enjoy crime novels. My all time favourite series is the Harry Bosch books by Michael Connelly. They just have great characterisation, a lovely poetic yet economical style, and good stories. Anyway, during my convalescence I tried to read a paper based book for about half an hour each day (I figured that it would not strain my eyes too much). And one of the books that

Review - The Shannara Chronicles - Chosen

The advertising was very persuasive. The cinematography on the advertisements blew me away. And Terry Brooks’ books had been favourites of mine as a teenager. I can remember reading Sword of Shannara in the library and then going out and buying Elfstones the moment that it was published (1982?). But still there was lingering doubt. I still remember the appalling mess that was the 2004 mini series based upon A

Review: "The Imitation Game" (2014)

As some of you know, I am a computer professional. These days I operate in the realm of IT security and information management. In the past my career has included software engineering, database administration, general IT support, and so on. At university, while studying computing, I learnt about Alan Turing. Turing was a brilliant mathematician and went on to become one of the fathers of modern computing. Among other things